In this Nov. 6, 2015 file photo, Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson speaks during the Black Republican Caucus of South Florida event benefiting the group's scholarship fund, in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. Carson has held hardly any campaign events in the past month, spending much of his time instead on a book tour financed by his publisher. Next month, with the Iowa caucuses weeks away, he plans to take a long trip to Africa. The retired neurosurgeon's unorthodox pursuit of the Oval Office has nonetheless put him atop the GOP field. Next up: whether his record can withstand the scrutiny faced by all presidential front-runners. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz, File)

In this Nov. 6, 2015 file photo, Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson speaks during the Black Republican Caucus of South Florida event benefiting the group’s scholarship fund, in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. Carson has held hardly any campaign events in the past month, spending much of his time instead on a book tour financed by his publisher. Next month, with the Iowa caucuses weeks away, he plans to take a long trip to Africa. The retired neurosurgeon’s unorthodox pursuit of the Oval Office has nonetheless put him atop the GOP field. Next up: whether his record can withstand the scrutiny faced by all presidential front-runners. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz, File)

A new national poll suggests that the United States could very well elect another Black president—with the help of African-American voters.

A Quinnipiac University poll released Nov. 4 shows Republican frontrunner Dr. Ben Carson ahead of Democratic shoo-in candidate Hillary Clinton. Asked who they would vote for in a race between Carson and Clinton, potential electors voted 50 percent to 40 percent in favor of the former.

“Is there a doctor in the house? There certainly is and at the moment Dr. Ben Carson is delivering a troubling diagnosis to Secretary Hillary Clinton,” said Tim Malloy, assistant director of the Quinnipiac University Poll, in a statement. “With the election one year away, Ben Carson has surgically cut away all but one GOP opponent and taken a scalpel to Hillary Clinton’s lead.

“But a year is an eternity in presidential campaigns and this race already has left some former front-runners on life support.”

Carson’s potential win hinged on Republican support. Among potential GOP voters, Carson gained 23 percent, second only to Donald Trump (24 percent) among Republican candidates. Carson also chipped away at Clinton’s historical support among women. Women go 45 percent for Carson and 44 percent for Clinton, according to the Quinnipiac poll.

Clinton’s potential defeat seemed to be based on character issues.  Of those surveyed, 60 percent of voters said the former first lady and secretary of state is not honest or trustworthy. Contrastingly, Carson gained the highest honesty rating among the candidates, at 62 percent.

Remarkably – or not – Carson also seemed to get a boost from Black voters. The renowned surgeon gained 19 percent support among African-American would-be voters against Clinton’s 73 percent.

The last time a Republican presidential candidate garnered double-digit support among Black voters was more than 10 years ago, when George W. Bush won the White House, according to TheGrio.com. In September, the AFRO reported on a study showing African Americans favored party over race, meaning they were unlikely to support Black Republican candidates.

Still, after Black voters helped deliver the White House to President Barack Obama for two terms, the GOP has been trying to make inroads into that voting bloc.

Carson recently released an urban radio advertisement aimed at young Black voters in eight markets, according to ABC. The 60-second ad features rapper Aspiring Mogul urging people to “Vote…Ben Carson 2016,” interspersed with portions of Carson’s stump speech.