Protesters took to the streets on Oct. 19 after members of the Baltimore City Council voted to confirm Police Chief Kevin Davis as the head of the city’s police department.

Protester Mecca Verdell cries as she chants during a demonstration, Monday, Oct. 19, 2015, in Baltimore. Protesters marched after the City Council confirmed Kevin Davis as the city's permanent police commissioner. The council's vote came five days after a committee voted in favor of hiring Davis and demonstrators held a sit-in to demand meetings with Davis and Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Protester Mecca Verdell cries as she chants during a demonstration, Monday, Oct. 19, 2015, in Baltimore. Protesters marched after the City Council confirmed Kevin Davis as the city’s permanent police commissioner. The council’s vote came five days after a committee voted in favor of hiring Davis and demonstrators held a sit-in to demand meetings with Davis and Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Davis won the vote 12-2 with City Councilman Carl Stokes, who is running for mayor, and Councilman Nick J. Mosby, who is rumored to be considering a run, voting no. Davis was a former deputy under Anthony W. Batts who was fired from the position earlier this year.

“We need stability in the Police Department,” said Brandon Scott, city councilman, during the hearing. “We cannot have a temporary captain of the ship with all the violence in the city and the trials coming up. … I have confidence that the commissioner will do a better job of working with everyone to get the crime rate down.”

Following protests last week, Bernard C. “Jack” Young, council president ordered the balcony overlooking the chamber closed citing safety concerns. Many of the people who had come to witness the proceedings were unable to get in. About 20 minutes into the meeting, many protesters spilled out of the meeting, chanting things like “No justice, no peace, no racist police!”

The group of about 40, marched from City Hall to the Inner Harbor – often walking directly in the streets and stopping traffic. They stopped at McKeldin Square and eventually headed back to City Hall, where police had set up barricades.

Organizers told the group to follow police orders and avoid getting arrested. The group had dispersed by around 6:30 p.m.

Activist Kwame Rose said that Davis went back on his word after a meeting that was held Oct. 18 involving several activists and Davis.

Protesters block traffic, Monday, Oct. 19, 2015, in Baltimore, after the City Council confirmed Kevin Davis as the city’s permanent police commissioner. The council’s vote came five days after a committee voted in favor of hiring Davis and demonstrators held a sit-in to demand meetings with Davis and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

“Last night the Commissioner met with four young activists including myself and he agreed to the 19 rules of engagement. We went and we reworked every word of those 19 rules of engagement and even added a 20th rule of engagement which was that Baltimore City Police would designate one community liaison from the police department to coordinate with the protesters so that our First Amendment rights would be respected.”

“Today he had until 12 p.m. to adhere to that and make a public statement and we agreed. We left that meeting with an agreement that that would happen and that did not happen. The Commissioner has continued to show that he is not interested in the respect of black young people in this city who care about their lives and their first amendment rights.”

Baltimore mayoral candidate Calvin Young was inside the City Council meeting. He was in the overflow room officials had set up since the balcony was closed. People inside the overflow room could watch the proceedings on a monitor.

“The vote came up and it was passed. After it was passed that’s when the demonstrators – those that were in the overflow room where I was – they all proceeded to get up and go towards the chambers. Also, from the screen we could see that demonstrations had begun in the chambers. I got up, the group that I was with, and we started paying attention and they had actually closed the doors to the chambers so those who were in the overflow room from what I could see did not make it into the actual chambers. Eventually everybody was escorted out and they started marching.”

Damon Mathews-Bey, a Baltimore City employee who said he had come to the meeting because he was concerned about an issue unrelated to Davis’ confirmation, said he was upset that he wasn’t let into the meeting.

“I was disturbed, very disturbed, because it’s supposed to be open to all the citizens in Baltimore and I’m a tax paying citizen also a worker for the city of Baltimore. I felt a little let down.”

Following the vote, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake swore Davis in as new commissioner at a community meeting. “We have to fight violent crime in a new and different way,” Davis told reporters. “It’s going to take our best efforts and building relationships with the community.”

Davis’s five year, $200,000 annual salary, contract will face another vote on Wednesday in the form of the Board Estimates. The Board of Estimates is in charge of spending for the city and is controlled by Rawlings-Blake.