Hardly anything went well for the Baltimore Ravens in their 40-17 loss to the Philadelphia Eagles in Week Two of the NFL preseason on Aug. 22 in Philly.

Philadelphia Eagles' Tim Tebow in action during the second half of a preseason NFL football game against the Baltimore Ravens, Saturday, Aug. 22, 2015, in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Michael Perez)

Philadelphia Eagles’ Tim Tebow in action during the second half of a preseason NFL football game against the Baltimore Ravens, Saturday, Aug. 22, 2015, in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Michael Perez)

Though they only played just about a quarter of the game, Baltimore’s starters were awful during their time on the field and were easily outperformed by the Eagles’ first string units. The Ravens had spent the three days prior to the game in joint practices with the Eagles. But they played Saturday night as if they had never seen Philly play before. Eagles head coach Chip Kelly’s up-tempo offense had the Eagles moving down the field with ease against the Ravens’ defense and resulted in two quick first quarter touchdowns for an early 14-0 lead.

Both of Philly’s first quarter touchdowns came after Baltimore turned over the ball. Ravens veteran quarterback Joe Flacco was at fault for both turnovers as he tossed two wildly uncharacteristic interceptions during Baltimore’s first two offensive series. The first pick was an intended deep pass to receiver Kamar Aiken that was tipped right into the hands of Eagles cornerback Walter Thurmond. Flacco’s second interception was intended to hit a wide open Marlon Brown, but the big-armed QB overthrew him by a mile, and Eagles cornerback Byron Maxwell was in the right place at the right time to make an easy snag on the overthrown pass.

Flacco played one more series but it resulted in a punt. It was just one of those “bad days” for the former Super Bowl MVP quarterback.

Penalties Plagued the Ravens All Game

The Ravens wouldn’t turn the ball over again in the game, but they still found other ways to shoot themselves in the foot. Baltimore committed more than 20 penalties in the game; Philly accepted only 17 of Baltimore’s penalties, but that still resulted in well over 100 yards of free penalty yardage.

Baltimore Ravens’ Terrence Magee in action during the second half of a preseason NFL football game against the Philadelphia Eagles, Saturday, Aug. 22, 2015, in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Michael Perez)

One of Baltimore’s penalties, however, may not have been warranted – veteran outside linebacker Terrell Suggs was called for a roughing-the-passer penalty during Philadelphia’s first offensive series. Suggs had hit Eagles starting quarterback Sam Bradford low after he handed the ball off to his running back on a read-option play. Suggs argued with the game officials that he had the right to hit Bradford because of the nature of the play call. During read-option plays, quarterbacks read the outside linebacker and decide whether to hand the ball off to their running back or keep the ball and run themselves. If the linebacker bites on a fake handoff to the running back, the QB can keep the ball and run outside for easy yards. To neutralize this play, defenders often crash hard on the quarterback to make sure he never runs with the ball. Suggs did just that, crashing hard on Bradford, but the referees penalized him for roughing the passer.

The television analysts commentating on the game suggested that the refs called the penalty to safeguard Bradford, a former No. 1 overall draft pick who missed the last two seasons with knee injuries. But Suggs still believes his hit on Bradford was fair game.

Baltimore Ravens’ Jeremy Butler dives for the end zone on a failed two-point conversion during the second half of a preseason NFL football game against the Philadelphia Eagles, Saturday, Aug. 22, 2015, in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Michael Perez)

“When you run the read-option, you have to know the rules,” Suggs told reporters after the game. “If you want to run the read-option with your starting quarterback that’s had two knee surgeries, that’s on you. That’s not my responsibility to update you on the rule. I could’ve hit him harder on that. I didn’t. I eased up.”

Backup QB Provides Lone Positive

Baltimore’s lone positive in the game didn’t come until the fourth quarter when third-string quarterback Bryn Renner took over. Renner dominated the Eagles’ third stringers, completing 15 of 21 pass attempts for 158 yards and two touchdowns.