The past few weeks have been a magical time for Black women athletes, as African American and Black women of other countries have dominated the 2016 Olympics in Rio.

United States' Simone Biles displays her gold medal for floor during the artistic gymnastics women's apparatus final at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Tuesday, Aug. 16, 2016. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

United States’ Simone Biles displays her gold medal for floor during the artistic gymnastics women’s apparatus final at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Tuesday, Aug. 16, 2016. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

First, 19-year-old gymnast Simone Biles and 20-year-old swimmer Simone Manuel mesmerized and put the world on notice with the “Black Excellence” displayed in their early events. The African American pair claimed eight Olympic medals in

United States’ Simone Manuel shows off her gold medal during the medal ceremony for the women’s 100-meter freestyle final during the swimming competitions at the 2016 Summer Olympics, Friday, Aug. 12, 2016, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)

all for the U.S., including six gold. Thirty-year-old shot putter Michelle Carter was also a contributor to the early success, winning gold for the U.S. in the women’s shot put event on Aug. 12. Carter’s win marked the first medal for any American woman in the event since 1960.

United States’ Michelle Carter celebrates winning the gold medal in the women’s shot put during the athletics competitions of the 2016 Summer Olympics at the Olympic stadium in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Saturday, Aug. 13, 2016. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

But when the track and field events began this week, African-American women completely took over the Olympics, showcasing their superiority in perhaps the most watchable set of events.

Gold medal winner Brianna Rollins is flanked by silver medal winner Nia Ali, left, and bronze medal winner Kristi Castlin, all from the United States, during the medal ceremony for the women’s 100-meter hurdles at the athletics competitions of the 2016 Summer Olympics at the Olympic stadium in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Thursday, Aug. 18, 2016. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

The world witnessed the height of their superiority on Aug. 17 when U.S. women swept the finals of the 100-meter hurdles. Briana Rollins, Nia Ali and Kristi Catlin took the gold, silver and bronze in the event, the first time the feat had ever been accomplished.

Gold medalist Bahamas’ Shaunae Miller, center, silver medalist United States’ Allyson Felix, left, and bronze medalist Jamaica’s Shericka Jackson holds their medals awarded for the women’s 400-meters during the athletics competitions of the 2016 Summer Olympics at the Olympic stadium in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Tuesday, Aug. 16, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

Allyson Felix showcased her own magic by claiming silver in the 400-meter event on Aug. 15. The medal made her the most decorated female track and field athlete in U.S. Olympic history with seven career Olympic wins, including four gold and three silver.  Felix, 30, finished just 0.07 seconds behind Bahamian runner Shaunae Miller, another Black woman who attended the University of Georgia. Miller’s win was one of the most dramatic moments of the Olympics so far, as she actually dove off her feet across the finish line just to finish ahead of Felix.

Dalilah Muhammad, right, from the United States celebrates the gold medal in the women’s 400-meter hurdles final with third placed compatriot Ashley Spencer during the athletics competitions of the 2016 Summer Olympics at the Olympic stadium in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Thursday, Aug. 18, 2016. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

On Aug. 18, African-American Muhammad Dalilah took gold in the 400-meter hurdles, while fellow African-American Ashley Spencer earned bronze in the same event.

United States’ gold medal winner Tianna Bartoletta (right) and United States silver medal winner Brittney Reese during the ceremony for the women’s long jump during the athletics competitions of the 2016 Summer Olympics at the Olympic stadium in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Thursday, Aug. 18, 2016. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

In the field, 30-year-old long jumper Tianna Bartoletta delivered a personal best jump of 7.17 meters (23 feet, 6-1/4 inches) to capture gold in the women’s long jump on Aug. 17.

From left to right, silver medallist United States’ Tori Bowie, gold medallist Jamaica’s Elaine Thompson, and bronze medallist Jamaica’s Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce display their medals for the women’s 100-meter final during the athletics competitions of the 2016 Summer Olympics at the Olympic stadium in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Sunday, Aug. 14, 2016. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

But it’s not just the Black women of the U.S. that have been racking up medals. Jamaican sprinter Elaine Thompson won gold in the 100-meter dash event with a time of 10.71 seconds. She earned gold in the 200-meter too, finishing in 21.78 seconds. Fellow Jamaican Shelly-Ann Frazier-Pryce took bronze in the 100 meter dash at 10.86, while African-American Tori Bowie won silver at 10.83. Bowie also won bronze in the 200-meter race.

As of Aug. 19, African-American women have won 10 medals in track and field events in Rio. But just about every medal of any track and field event during these Olympics belongs to a Black woman, regardless of her nationality—and it doesn’t get any more “black and magical” than that.

Perry Green

AFRO Sports Editor