Archaeologists in Boston this week began excavating at the boyhood home of Malcolm X, hoping to gain insight into the slain civil rights activist’s childhood and the lives of the home’s previous owners.

Rodnell P. Collins carries a painting of his uncle Malcolm X outside the house where the slain African-American activist spent part of his teen years, Tuesday, March 29, 2016, in the Roxbury section of Boston. Archeologists are undertaking a two-week dig at the home in an effort to uncover more about his early life, when he was known as Malcolm Little and lived there with his sister’s family in the 1940s. (AP Photo/Bill Sikes)

From March 29 through April 8, archaeologists at The City Archaeology Lab and the Fiske Center for Archaeological Research at the University of Massachusetts Boston, will comb through the property at 72 Dale St., located in the historically Black neighborhood of Roxbury.

Born Malcolm Little on May 19, 1925, in Omaha, Neb., Malcolm X endured an itinerant childhood due to his family’s persecution at the hands of the Ku Klux Klan and other White supremacists. At the age of 15, the high school dropout moved to Boston to live with his older half-sister, Ella Little-Collins and her husband Kenneth Collins, according to Biography.com.

When Rodnell Collins – who grew up with his parents and his uncle Malcolm in Roxbury – informed the city he wanted to renovate the house to conduct public tours, Boston’s city archaeologist Joseph Bagley decided to conduct the dig before valuable artifacts were lost.

Bagley said working side-by-side with the younger Collins is an invaluable opportunity.

City archeologist Joe Bagley, right, digs as volunteer Rosemary Pinales sifts soil for items at the house where slain African-American activist Malcolm X spent part of his teen years, Tuesday, March 29, 2016, in the Roxbury section of Boston. Archeologists are undertaking a two-week dig at the home in an effort to uncover more about his early life, when he was known as Malcolm Little and lived there with his sister’s family in the 1940s. (AP Photo/Bill Sikes)

“As archaeologists, we never ever get to turn to the person next to us and be like, ‘What’s this?’” Bagley told NBC News. “It’s amazing, it feels like we’re almost cheating.”

The archaeologist told Boston Magazine he hoped to find “personal items” and “little tidbits.”

“It’s really just kind of contributing whatever we find to what we already know from Rodnell,” he said. “To see if we can add some more color to it.”

John Steinberg, research scientist at the Fiske Center, used the dig as an opportunity to apply geophysical testing techniques to an urban dig.

“Generally in the inner city, you just dig. You don’t use the technology first,” Steinberg told NBC. “The geophysics allows the archaeologists to dig less and learn more.”

Already, the team has unearthed fragments of broken dishes, which Rodnell Collins confirmed belonged to his mother. The archaeologists have also discovered cobblestones and other signs of a buried landscape, and piece of a smoking pipe that may have belonged to the Irish family from whom the Collins purchased the house.

Bagley is encouraging members of the public to visit the dig site for the duration of the project between the hours of 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.