Dr. Conrad Murray, Michael Jackson’s personal doctor, will face manslaughter charges for his alleged role in Jackson’s death Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Michael Pastor ordered Jan. 11 after lifting the cardiologist’s California medical license.

The action came at the end of a six-day preliminary hearing into what role Murray played in the death of the King of Pop. Pastor said he believes there is enough evidence to warrant a trial and directed Murray, who has pleaded not guilty to manslaughter, to be arraigned Jan. 25.


The decision came after a forensic evidence expert testified that he believed Jackson’s death was a homicide. Christopher Rogers, head of forensic medicine for the Los Angeles County Corner’s Office said that Jackson died of acute intoxication of the drug propofol.

He said that even if Jackson had taken the drug on his own, he would still rule his death a homicide.

“Based on the quality of the medical care, I would still call this a homicide, even if the doctor did not provide the propofol to Mr. Jackson,” Rogers said according to Business World Magazine.

Murray admittedly gave Propofol, an anesthetic used to sedate patients, to Jackson—an action questioned by Pastor.

“Isn’t the person still sleep deprived?” Pastor asked Murray’s defense attorneys, according to Reuters. “What purpose does it do to administer a dose that’s only going to keep the person asleep for five minutes?”

During the hearings, details of Jackson’s final days were disclosed. According to Reuters, Jackson called the propofol his “milk” and it left him in such bad health that his urine was collected through a device for incontinent patients.

However, the hearing also revealed that he was a dedicated father who tried to give his three children a normal life.

Pastor also revoked Murray’s medical license in California. Texas and Nevada, the other two states where Murray is licensed, are expected follow suit.

Leigh Hopper, a spokeswoman for Texas’ medical board told The Los Angeles Times that Pastor’s ruling “gives us the authority to do a similar action.”

“We certainly have the option of suspending him,” she said.