Micha Green, AFRO Washington, D.C. Editor, mgreen@afro.com

While rap has been known to highlight women, drugs, money and violence, in recent years a more emotional style has been popularized by rappers such as Drake, Logic, J. Cole and Wale.

One of these rappers isn’t like the others.

Following Kanye West’s “Ye vs. The People” featuring T.I. and Childish Gambino’s groundbreaking song and video “This is America” is Wale joining the band of rappers attempting to further a political conversation regarding race and division? (Screenshot)

Nigerian American and DMV native, Wale, contends that his complexion and African heritage hurt his career.

A fan asked Wale via Twitter, if his “expressive passion for the music hurt” or prevented him from being mentioned with his contemporaries.

Wale agreed that his passion hurt him “greatly” and replied saying, “Also being a dark skinned (not half white) rapper direct from Africa did too… but let’s not go there.”

Though Wale may not have been directly calling anyone directly, rappers similar in delivery and content such as Drake, Logic, and J. Cole, are all light skinned rappers who are considerably more successful.

Now it’s not apparent how Wale has been “greatly” hurt, yet it is clear he’s feeling some pain in the hip hop game because of his complexion.

As Panama Jackson, contributor for Very Smart Brothas wrote, Wale mentioning biracial and fair-skinned rappers having more success is “stating his version of the truth.”

After the buzz of Wale’s colorism accusations hit Twitter some people agreed while others felt the rapper was being whiney and salty that his music was not as catchy as the other rappers he appeared to reference.

Following the weekend’s colorism conversation, Wale released a video via Twitter admitting to saying controversial things.  He captioned the video, “never told u I was perfect. I mess up (a lot). Pls watch.”

“Ok, sometimes I put my foot in my mouth.  I get it.  But I think that sarcasm gotta be our greatest weapon,” Wale said in the video while smoking.

“Boys and girls answer yourself this question.  What travels and captivates quicker?  A compliment or an insult?”

The video ends with the words, “SELF PROMOTION” and “OUT NOW.”

So now the questions begin to swirl.  Did Wale take a page out of Kanye’s book?  Was the colorism conversation a way to get people talking before he dropped an album?

Following Kanye West’s “Ye vs. The People” featuring T.I. and Childish Gambino’s groundbreaking song and video “This is America” is Wale joining the band of rappers attempting to further a political conversation regarding race and division?