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Shawn Dean of Brighton, Colo. waits for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump to speak during the opening session of the Western Conservative Summit, Friday, July 1, 2016, in Denver. The summit, which brings together Republicans from across the West, runs through Sunday. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

A new national poll shows that support for Donald Trump within the Black community is almost nil.

A Quinnipiac University poll released June 29 shows that only 1 percent of African-American voters is backing the Republican presumptive nominee for president. Comparatively, his chief rival, Democratic presumptive nominee Hillary Clinton has 91 percent support among that voting bloc.

The ranking is a new low for Republican presidential nominees among African-American voters—in 2012, Mitt Romney culled 6 percent of the Black vote and in 2008, John McCain garnered 4 percent.

The New York Daily News deemed it important to rub the statistic in the real estate mogul’s face. Its June 30 front page headline read, “Orange is Not the New Black” alongside a photo of Trump’s overly-tanned face.

The headline references a joke made by President Obama during an appearance on “The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon,” on June 9. When asked if he was following news about Trump, the president replied he had been watching “orange is not the new black.”

The poll’s findings were not that surprising given Trump’s penchant for making divisive, racist and xenophobic statements about minorities and Muslims.

Unexpectedly, however, Trump did much better among Latino voters although his controversial statements about Hispanics have been more widely publicized. According to the poll, one-third of Hispanic voters support Trump, compared to 50 percent for Clinton.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump walks past cheering attendees before speaking at a rally at Ohio University Eastern Campus in St. Clairsville, Ohio, Tuesday, June 28, 2016. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump walks past cheering attendees before speaking at a rally at Ohio University Eastern Campus in St. Clairsville, Ohio, Tuesday, June 28, 2016. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Trump resonated more strongly among Whites, who back him 47 percent compared to Clinton who holds favor over a little more than one-third (34 percent) of White voters.

Seemingly prompted by Trump’s incendiary comments about racial minorities, the survey showed that a majority—61 percent—of American voters believe the 2016 election has increased the level of hatred and prejudice in the U.S. Of that 61 percent, 67 percent blame the Trump campaign and 16 percent blame the Clinton campaign.

Voters seem to share a similar distaste for both candidates, however.  Clinton and Trump are virtually neck and neck—garnering 42 percent to 40 percent, respectively—as American voters say neither candidate would be a good president, the poll findings show.

“It would be difficult to imagine a less flattering from-the-gut reaction to Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton,” said Tim Malloy, assistant director of the Quinnipiac University Poll. “This is where we are. Voters find themselves in the middle of a mean-spirited, scorched earth campaign between two candidates they don’t like. And they don’t think either candidate would be a good president.”

 

Zenitha Prince

Special to the AFRO