In this June 14, 2015 file photo, Zoe Saldana attends the Los Angeles Premiere of "Infinitely Polar Bear" held at Regal Cinemas L.A. LIVE in Los Angeles. After many delays, the Nina Simone biopic starring Saldana and David Oyelowo will be simultaneously released in theaters, digital HD and video-on-demand next month. Distributor RLJ Entertainment said Tuesday, March 1, 2016, it will release “Nina” in all formats on April 22. (Photo by John Salangsang/Invision/AP, File)

In this June 14, 2015 file photo, Zoe Saldana attends the Los Angeles Premiere of “Infinitely Polar Bear” held at Regal Cinemas L.A. LIVE in Los Angeles. After many delays, the Nina Simone biopic starring Saldana and David Oyelowo will be simultaneously released in theaters, digital HD and video-on-demand next month. Distributor RLJ Entertainment said Tuesday, March 1, 2016, it will release “Nina” in all formats on April 22. (Photo by John Salangsang/Invision/AP, File)

Actress Zoe Saldana recently faced a new round of criticism on social media following the release of a trailer for an upcoming biopic, “Nina,” in which she plays musician and activist Nina Simone.

The casting of Saldana, who is of Dominican and Puerto Rican descent, as Simone has been the source of controversy since the move was announced in 2012. But the recent release of a trailer and marketing materials for the movie, which appear to show Saldana in skin-darkening makeup and a prosthetic nose for the role, triggered a new wave of outrage.

Notably, a Twitter account representing Simone’s estate had harsh words for Saldana after the actress tweeted a Simone quote on March 1.

“Cool story but please take Nina’s name out your mouth. For the rest of your life,” the tweet stated.

In this June 27, 1985 file photo, singer Nina Simone perfroms at Avery Fisher Hall. Actress Zoe Saldana will star in the upcoming Nina Simone biopic, “Nina.” (AP Photo/Rene Perez, File)

Simone died of breast cancer in 2003.

The singer’s only child, Lisa Simone Kelly, 53, has distanced herself from the movie since its announcement, but told Time magazine on March 3 that she was unaware of the tweet directed at Saldana. Kelly told the magazine that the entire production deserved criticism, not Saldana.

“It’s unfortunate that Zoe Saldana is being attacked so viciously when she is someone who is part of a larger picture,” said Kelly. “It’s clear she brought her best to this project, but unfortunately she’s being attacked when she’s not responsible for any of the writing or the lies.”

The Simone estate’s Twitter account was not the sole source of scorn, however. Widespread social media posts disparaged the movie, the choice to use makeup and prosthetics on Saldana rather than cast an actress of a different appearance, and pointed out the social issues around that choice.

According to The Washington Post, humor writer Luvvie Ajayi said she would follow Kelly’s advice to not see the movie when it premieres April 22.

“Maybe I’m just being a hater but this is a terrible choice, in my opinion. I won’t be supporting this movie. Not just because Zoe’s clearly a bad casting decision, but because Nina Simone’s own daughter is sternly against it for many reasons (and they’re justifiable),” Luvvie wrote. “They can keep this one.”

Robert L. Johnson, founder and chairman of RLJ Entertainment (and also former owner and founder of BET), which will distribute Nina, told Rolling Stone that “Zoe Saldana delivers an exceptional and mesmerizing tribute to Nina Simone.”

“She gave her heart and soul to the role and displayed her extraordinary talent,” Johnson said. “The most important thing is that creativity or quality of performance should never be judged on the basis of color, or ethnicity, or physical likeness. Quality entertainment should be measured by the sheer force of creativity and the commitment that an actor or actress brings to the performance.”