A handful of Black women have entered the pornography industry as producers and directors, but writer Arielle Loren said their numbers are too low to influence an industry dominated by videos that degrade women and often racist. .

Loren, in an essay in Clutch Magazine, called for the emergence of a Black feminist movement within the pornography industry.

Loren added that there should be more films “for us, by us,” and that Black women should be given a platform in the industry.

“Racial fantasies oversaturate the market and porn directors continue to showcase voluptuous Black women’s bodies as fetish pieces for White and Black men,” Loren writes. “The state of Black feminist porn is dire; there are numerous obstacles ahead to achieving the visual production of Black women’s desire and truthfully, the mantra needs to be `For us, By us.’”

The 2006 film “Afrodite Superstar” is said to be the first Black adult film by and for women of color, according to Loren. Abiola Abrams, an author and a filmmaker who uses the pseudonym Venus Hottentot, directed the film and said that she made the movie to combat sexual exploitation of African-American women.

“Certain things were important to me in this film—condom usage, dark skinned Black women with natural textured hair and natural bodies,” she said, “Dark skin, stretch marks, small breasts and Afro-textured hair are viewed largely as beauty liabilities. I wanted to create those things as a part of the visual landscape of this story.”

Although explicit sex scenes are part of the film, Abrams said that she does not see her film as porn.

“I don’t like to get caught up in the semantics of language, but my intention was to direct an indie film that was also sexual, not a sex film, so I don’t use the word porn to describe the film,” she said. “It’s gorgeous, intense, hot, steamy, sexy, but no pornographic. However, call it whatever floats your boat.”

Loren also noted the ranks of Black women adult film directors include Estelle Joseph, who directed an award-winning series called “City of Flesh,” and Shine Louise Houston, who produces transgender films.

In an April 28 CNN Health article, “Do women like porn as much as men?,” New York Times best-selling author and sexuality counselor Ian Kerner said more women are using porn to get themselves in the mood for sex or to explore their own sexuality.

Kerner added that porn is generally dedicated to men and usually lacks elements that cater to female sexuality, such as foreplay, intimacy and erotic storylines. But times have changed with the feminist movement in pornography.

“Well, today there are many porn sites geared toward women. In fact, there’s even a regular Feminist Porn Awards that recognizes erotic entertainment that is smart, sexy, and appreciates women as viewers,” he wrote. “Combine recognition of a female audience with the rapid proliferation of easily accessible Internet porn, and it only makes sense that more women are enjoying porn.”
 

 

Erica Butler

AFRO Staff Writer