FrederickDouglasWax2

A lifelike wax figure of Frederick Douglass was unveiled at Madame Tussauds Washington D.C. museum. (Photo courtesy of madametussauds.com)

A lifelike wax figure of Frederick Douglass was unveiled at Madame Tussauds Washington D.C. museum in Northwest on Feb. 5. This is only the beginning of the homage being paid to Douglass. On Feb. 14, his wax figure will be moved to his former home, the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site at 1411 W St. SE.

“This is an honor to have him in our collection, which features those who leave a lasting legacy,” said Lauren Cotrell, senior sales and marketing manager for Madame Tussauds. “Frederick Douglass accepted his birth date as Feb. 14, he also died in February, and February is Black History Month. So this is the perfect time to honor him.”

According to Kenneth C. Davis’s book {Don’t Know Much About History}, Douglass made a vast contribution to society and history. He was a man of integrity with a life devoted to the cause of freedom for women as well as Blacks. Douglas became one of the most famous men in America, Black or White, the book said.

“There has been a lot of interest in the Frederick Douglass figure being moved to his former residence on Feb. 14,” Cotrell said. “We anticipate a lot of African-American leaders making an appearance and sharing their thoughts with us.”

Douglass’ story is special because it is local. Born to a slave mother, Douglas was taught to read by the wife of one of his masters. Later, he taught himself how to write while working in the shipyards in Baltimore, and became an extraordinary public speaker. “He was a prominent abolitionist during his lifetime,” Cotrell said. “His work and story have been such an overwhelming inspiration. I am happy to be a part of something so special.”