Alicia D. White, one of six Baltimore city police officers charged in connection with Freddie Gray's death arrives at a side door, for a court appearance on Tuesday, Oct. 13, 2015 in Baltimore.  All six officers appeared before Judge Barry Williams, who is to determine whether their still undisclosed statements will be allowed at trial. (Barbara Haddock Taylor /The Baltimore Sun via AP)  WASHINGTON EXAMINER OUT; MANDATORY CREDIT

Alicia D. White, one of six Baltimore city police officers charged in connection with Freddie Gray’s death arrives at a side door, for a court appearance on Oct. 13 in Baltimore. All six officers appeared before Judge Barry Williams, who is to determine whether their still undisclosed statements will be allowed at trial. (Barbara Haddock Taylor /The Baltimore Sun via AP)

The States Attorney’s office scored another victory in the Freddie Gray case. On Tuesday, Judge Barry Williams ruled that statements that Sgt. Alicia T. White made to police on April 12 and 17 are admissible in court.

White is one of six officers accused in the April death of Freddie Gray. All six were in court for the Oct. 13 proceedings.

Ivan Bates, speaking for the defense, argued that the statements were improperly obtained. He told the judge that White was “compelled” to give a statement or face discipline. However Deputy State’s Attorney Jan Bledsoe said that during both interviews, White was asked to speak – not ordered. She said that she was “incredulous” at the idea that Bates would think White wouldn’t know that.

“She was always free to go,” Williams said during his ruling. “The court will presume that she was in good mental and physical condition.”

Williams said that giving an interview is not the same as White being told that she had to make a statement, and that she had the opportunity to say no.

Three investigators from the department’s Force Investigation Team took the stand to talk about what happened during those two interactions with White. The first officer said that since the first meeting was just an interview, there was no need to read White her Miranda Rights or inform her of her rights under the Law Officers’ Bill of Rights.

At the second interview, after the investigation had progressed, White was advised of her Miranda rights and her rights under the Law Officers’ Bill of Rights. Bledsoe entered video of White signing documents asserting that she had been made aware of both into evidence.

The hearing at times got contentious. Bledsoe rejected Bates’ attempts to paint a scene of White feeling pressured to speak about the incident at every turn. At one point, the judge raised his voice, ordering both sides to be quiet.

Three other officers filed to withdraw their motions to suppress the statements that they gave relating to the case. A second hearing is scheduled for Oct. 14 at 9:30 a.m.