Pedestrian wait to cross 13th street in downtown Washington during an evening snowfall, Wednesday, Jan. 20, 2016. As Washington prepares for this weekend's snowstorm, now forecast to reach blizzard conditions, a small clipper system pushed through the region Wednesday night causing massive delays and issues on the roads.(AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Pedestrian wait to cross 13th street in downtown Washington during an evening snowfall, Wednesday, Jan. 20, 2016. As Washington prepares for this weekend’s snowstorm, now forecast to reach blizzard conditions, a small clipper system pushed through the region Wednesday night causing massive delays and issues on the roads.(AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Washington, D.C. leaders are preparing for one of the biggest snow storms in decades to hit the nation’s capital this weekend.

At a press conference at the Farragut Salt Dome on Jan. 21, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser declared a state of emergency for the city beginning at 9:30 a.m. on Jan. 22 ahead of Winter Storm Jonas.

However, she apologized to residents for mishaps related to a brief storm that went through the city on Jan. 20 which produced an unexpected seventh-tenths of an inch of snow. The accumulation clogged streets and forced many people to endure lengthy commutes.

“I want to say first and foremost to the residents of D.C. that we are very sorry for an inadequate response,” the mayor said. “We should have been out earlier with more resources.”

The mayor was joined in her announcement by D.C. City Administrator Rashad Young, D.C. Public Works Director Christopher Shorter, D.C. Department of Transportation Director Leif Dormsjo, D.C. Police Chief Cathy Lanier and D.C. Deputy Mayor for Public Safety Kevin Donahue. Bowser said that the city will be better prepared for Jonas.

Experts from the National Weather Service expected Jonas to produce snow accumulations between 1 and 2 feet, and winds as high as 50 miles per hour. The weather service said that snow may fall in the D.C. area as early as 8 a.m. on Jan. 22 and not end until late on Jan. 23.

The mayor said that District public schools will be closed on Jan. 22 and the District government will shut down at noon except for essential personnel. The snow emergency mandates that all vehicles on designated snow routes must be removed or the city will take the vehicles to an impoundment lot and impose a heavy fine.

Serve DC, the District government’s agency that promotes and manages volunteerism, said 2,000 residents have signed up to aid elderly and disabled neighbors by shoveling snow to clear their walkways and sidewalks.

Bowser said that city-wide efforts to clean up the snow will be an all-day affair on Jan. 24 and part of Jan. 25.

Shorter told the AFRO on Jan. 20 that his agency is ready for Jonas.

“This is my first snow event as director but we have been preparing for snow storms all year,” he said. “We have the resources to see that our streets will be cleared in a timely and efficient manner.”​