LaShanti Redmond, 10, of Flint, gets her finger poked to test her blood for lead levels at Freeman Elementary School in Flint, Mich., Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2016. The Flint Community Schools, the Genesee County Health Department and Molina Healthcare held a family fun night at the school to get children ages 0 to 6-year-olds tested for lead levels in their blood. The next testing event will be held at Eisenhower Elementary on Jan. 26. (Jake May/The Flint Journal-MLive.com via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

LaShanti Redmond, 10, of Flint, gets her finger poked to test her blood for lead levels at Freeman Elementary School in Flint, Mich., Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2016. The Flint Community Schools, the Genesee County Health Department and Molina Healthcare held a family fun night at the school to get children ages 0 to 6-year-olds tested for lead levels in their blood. The next testing event will be held at Eisenhower Elementary on Jan. 26. (Jake May/The Flint Journal-MLive.com via AP)

It’s outrageous that Flint is experiencing a citywide health crisis where 8,177 children have been diagnosed with lead in their bloodstreams.

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, long-term exposure for infants and children can lead to “delays in physical or mental development; children could show slight deficits in attention span and learning abilities.”

This is a humanitarian catastrophe that could have been avoided.

Here’s the reality: in order for the City of Flint to save money, the residents of Flint, a predominantly African American city, were cold heartedly all put at risk. It’s criminal.

In April 2014, Flint officials decided to cut costs by switching its water source from Lake Huron water -supplied by the Detroit water system – to water from the Flint River. Residents immediately began complaining about the water’s taste and also saying the water was cloudy and had a foul smell. But no one paid them any attention.

Gov. Rick Snyder speaks about the Flint water crisis during a press conference on Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016, at City Hall in downtown, Flint, Mich. Environmental and civil rights groups want a federal judge to order the prompt replacement of all lead pipes in Flint's water system to ensure that residents have a safe drinking supply, a demand that Snyder said on Wednesday might be a long-term option but not an immediate one. (Jake May /The Flint Journal-MLive.com via AP) LOCAL TELEVISION OUT; LOCAL INTERNET OUT; MANDATORY CREDIT

Gov. Rick Snyder speaks about the Flint water crisis during a press conference on Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016, at City Hall in downtown, Flint, Mich. Environmental and civil rights groups want a federal judge to order the prompt replacement of all lead pipes in Flint’s water system to ensure that residents have a safe drinking supply, a demand that Snyder said on Wednesday might be a long-term option but not an immediate one. (Jake May /The Flint Journal-MLive.com via AP)

Michigan’s Gov. Rick Snyder, a Republican, is facing all sorts of accusations of blame – among which includes Sen. Bernie Sanders, the Democratic presidential candidate, who said Synder should resign immediately.

We agree.

Snyder took office in 2011 so the water crisis happened on his watch. He claims he got bad information from environmental officials so he wasn’t able to move fast enough to address the crisis.

It’s a lame excuse. As governor, Snyder should have been more engaged the moment he learned that residents were complaining about the water.

“I’m sorry and I will fix it,” Snyder said during his recent speech to state officials. “Government failed you at the federal, state and local level.  “We need to make sure this never happens again in any Michigan city.”

But who else will be held accountable? 

Third-grader Mayae Carradine, 9, listens to her teacher as she looks through a sea of bottled water on Monday, Jan. 25, 2016 at Durant-Tuuri-Mott Elementary School, in Flint. This school hands out about 750 bottles of water per day, the equivalent of one per student. The school goes through approximately 3,750 bottles each week and at least 15,000 bottles per month. (Jake May/The Flint Journal- MLive.com via AP)

Susan Hedman, the head of the Midwest region of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, resigned last week over the water contamination crisis after she minimized an EPA memo that said tests had shown high levels of lead in the city’s water.

So would state officials have put a greater emphasis on fixing the problem if Flint wasn’t a predominantly Black city?

Perhaps. 

“We’ve had a city in the United States of America where the population, which is poor in many ways and majority African American, has been drinking and bathing in lead contaminated water,” Hillary Clinton, the Democratic frontrunner for president,  said during the presidential debate in South Carolina two weeks ago. “And the governor of that state acted as though he didn’t really care.” 

Meanwhile, Black and White entertainers are pitching in to help. The rapper, The Game, recently announced that he was  donating $500,000 of his own money to help with the water crisis in Flint. He also said that the water bottle company Avita Water is going to donate $500,000 to help the Flint victims.

R&B singer Kem helps Mwamini Wallace carry bottled water to her vehicle in Flint, Mich., Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2016. Kem donated $10,000 to the Salvation Army to aid efforts to provide bottled water to residents in the city where drinking water has been contaminated by lead. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)

R&B singer Kem helps Mwamini Wallace carry bottled water to her vehicle in Flint, Mich., Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2016. Kem donated $10,000 to the Salvation Army to aid efforts to provide bottled water to residents in the city where drinking water has been contaminated by lead. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)

AQUAhydrate, a water company owned by “Diddy Combs” and Mark Wahlberg has pledged 1 million bottles of water.  This generous offering goes along with other contributions by Aretha Franklin, who indicated that she will provide hotel rooms and food for up to 50 Flint residences; Cher, who has reportedly sent thousands bottles of water to Flint; and Eminem, Jimmy Fallon, Wiz Khalifa and other notables who have made similar contributions of water or money to aid the Flint citizens victimized by this insensitive governmental catastrophe.

Sadly, it’s too late for many: thousands of residents in Flint will experience serious health issues for the rest of their lives because they drank polluted water. But did Flint’s city officials also drink the tainted water?

In the meantime, Gov. Snyder should offer a brief note to the public: his resignation.